Therapy from the Therapist’s Perspective

In this post, Stacy Stefaniak Luther, PsyD, LPC, answers some questions about therapy and what a new mom can expect should she decide to seek help from a trained therapist.

What are some opening thoughts you’d like to share about therapy?

Visiting a therapist can be very intimidating. It takes courage not only to schedule that first appointment but also to attend that appointment. It can be weird, or awkward, to share your personal story with a stranger. Despite these facts, therapy is an effective way to tackle a variety of mental health concerns including those experienced with a perinatal mood or anxiety disorder. Furthermore. therapy can also serve as a means of self-care, which can be difficult to schedule with an infant but is also critically important to mom’s overall well-being.

As a therapist, I recognize the strength it takes to walk into the office each session and bare your soul; sharing intimate details of yourself and your life. But there is something so special about each individual’s story and the details of this story are worked into the therapeutic approach. Therapy is grounded in research, but treatment isn’t one-size-fits-all.

What can I expect at my first session?

Typically, the first session is a “get-to-know-you” session where the provider will ask a lot of questions and you will be encouraged to ask questions as well. Information about follow-up sessions is discussed at this time in addition to diagnosis, treatment, informed consent, confidentiality, and other more technical aspects of therapy. The first impression during this session is critically important. If you are not comfortable, (say so!) and ask about different providers. A client needs to feel comfortable sharing details that may be private and sensitive; therefore, finding a provider who is a good-fit is essential. Professionals will never be offended if the relationship spark just isn’t there. The relationship is the catalyst for healing so don’t be discouraged if finding the right partnership takes time.

How long is a typical session?

Therapy sessions are anywhere from 30-60 minutes, with 45 minutes being average. During these sessions, you are invited to sit back, relax, and share. The therapist will listen and help you reflect. You will also have the opportunity to learn and practice different skills outside of session. Most importantly, there will be validation that the emotions you are experiencing and the thoughts you are having are real and okay.

How often do I need to come to session?

There are many factors that contribute to scheduling future sessions. Typically, although each situation is unique, you will be asked to schedule 1 session a week (or every other week). During these sessions, your willingness and ability to be open and vulnerable is instrumental in determining the effectiveness of therapy.

Can I bring my baby (and/or my older children) to therapy?

If it serves as a barrier to treatment, a good therapist will encourage women to bring infants (and other children) to session if they want to (or have to). Other times, a mom who is able, might choose to find childcare so that she can enjoy her session independently. It is up the mother to determine what she is most comfortable with and what her lifestyle allows.

What is a therapy office like?

Offices are set up in a variety of different ways, yet all are designed to promote comfort and ease. These are not like your primary care provider’s office. Therapy offices are set up with a home-like atmosphere and often reflect the therapist’s personality.

What is a final message you’d like to leave our readers with?

One theme that is extremely common for the women I work with is how alone they feel. The truth is, there are others out there who have had similar experiences or who are currently experiencing the same difficulties. The women I work with have struggled with infertility, experienced the heartbreak of miscarriage, stillbirth, and infant loss. I’ve seen women who did not want to be pregnant or have children who become pregnant, women who struggle to bond with their infant, women who experience intense, frightening intrusive thoughts, women who are sad, women who are scared, women who don’t feel like themselves…the list goes on. It is so important to know that you are not alone. Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders exist but so does treatment. There is no shame in asking for or receiving help!

We would like to thank Stacy Stefaniak Luther, PsyD, LPC, for sharing her perspective with us. If you would like to learn more about Stacy and/or are local to central Wisconsin and would like to schedule an appointment with her, you may find more information on her website: http://www.bhcwausau.com/learn-stacy-luther-ms/ .

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